Sunday, October 12, 2008

Dept. of Reviteristics - The Solution is Delete!!

Whenever you get a warning message or use Review Warnings have you noticed that the solution Revit seems to think is the correct choice for practically every situation is to DELETE the offending element. It is sort of an "off with his head" reaction isn't it?? Is your wall giving you problems...DELETE IT! That's what I do and I feel much better! It is the "duct tape" solution in Revit...101 uses!

I think it would be wonderful if...since Revit caught a problem in the first place...the warnings were more meaningful, in "plain English" and offered us some more useful possibilities in addition to or other than DELETE!

Am I unanimous in this?

4 comments:

David Light said...

I totally agree. Revit should be able to assist you. Just saying "delete" without giving an option is a cop out. I'm not suggesting it should second guess what you want to do, but as we move forward it needs to have some intelligence to provide users with alternative routes.

Erik said...

For Crying out loud, that "other" BIM-like Autodesk software's warning went from the "Circle of Death" to the "Triangle of Hope." If AutoCAD Architecture can give suggestions on how to fix problems, how can its Smarter, Better Looking Brother get away with; "Just Delete it, everything will be alright." ????

Elisa said...

Yes, that is something I find irritating. I've had users think Revit knows all and go ahead and "delete" and then we have MORE warnings, and they wonder what's wrong. It is strange Revit's explanations aren't very useful. "plain English" really be appreciated!

alleycatbabe said...

I love the Alice in wonderland reference. I never thought of it that way until now. Yes I completely agree. Users have a tendency to completely ignore messages (I've found) & then come crying when things get deleted because they just clicked ok. Or they don't realize that they deleted it & start blaming Revit for "magically" deleting things. If they had more options they might have to pay attention to what they're doing.