Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Reusing the Same Grid Names

A reader saw a post by Brok on the HOK BIM Solutions blog and he wrote to me about this tip. His name is Mr. Smith, yeah uh that's his name, Mr. Smith... Well anyway the tip is this. We can use the right click option to insert unicode control character when editing the grid name parameter.



If we choose one it won't print but it will make Revit think that this grid #1 is different from this other grid #1. Pretty sneaky.

Mr. Smith's name has been changed to Mr. Jones to protect Mr. Smith.

P.S. My 2014 prediction is still that Revit will still be called Revit.

5 comments:

daveedwards said...

This trick can be used for a lot of things

dailyoccurrence said...

I 'know a guy' who does this all the time to override dimension values.

Devin C. said...

Isn't that kind of anti-Revit? Why would we want to purposely lie when there are other ways to accomplish the same thing while leaving the uniqueness of elements intact. What we do for is create an AltName parameter that we can use to override the number, but the underlying number parameter is still unique. This allows for more effective communication between consultants. Basically you don't have to qualify which grid number "1" you are refering to, because the one grid is "1" and the other is actually "_1" or something like that. But for documentation you get what you want, they would both read "1". My two cents...

Steve said...

What you are doing doesn't seem much different to me, semantics. Using a hidden character or using a completely different parameter that Revit doesn't care about being the same still results in more than one grid head appearing to have the same value as another.

One of the primary reasons people want them to be the same has been alleviated with multi-segment grids. In the case written about on the HOK Blog it was that grids can't be assigned to specific phases.

eric said...

I can't speak for these particular characters, but I just struggled through an issue where data was being exported from the Revit model to an XLSX file format. A hidden unicode character was corrupting the file when Excel tried to open it. I'm sure this was an accident in this case, but sometimes tricks like this have unintended consequences... I'm always wary of doing things that can't be discovered and sneaking in invisible characters falls squarely in that camp.