Monday, August 31, 2015

Revit Schmevit

Plan, Section and Elevation...the bread and butter of architecture. Why would anyone want to work on these three kinds views of a project and not find that the elements (doors, windows, walls, etc) they present don't match? If I create an enlarged plan shouldn't it match the plan it was generated from, but have greater detail? Shouldn't the windows called out in a plan match those called out in an elevation? Even if you get it perfect at the first submission I guarantee you'll miss stuff when the next design submission is due. By the time you get to the fourth...faahgeddaboudit.

BIM... I don't care if you ever learn what those three letters mean...

PLEASE, in the year of Two Thousand Fifteen, finally abandon your disconnected ways and use Revit (or ...Archicad).

Seriously, because the people that have to read your drawings aren't impressed.

7 comments:

Danny Jones said...

Nice rant Steve!

Aaron Maller said...

Its hard to believe some firms still work like that. Even when i did work in AutoCAD, it wasnt acceptable to have things drawn incorrectly. Ive seen some drawings in the last few weeks that make me seriously shake my head.

Joel Londenberg said...

I'm working on a project where the plumbing plans are incredibly inconsistent. The overall view, 3 enlarged views, and the isometric all show different piping layouts. Plus several of the callouts to enlarged views show the wrong detail / sheet numbers. Plus plus one of the enlarged views being called out doesn't exist - literally the domestic water isn't shown for a large restroom anywhere!

Grrr!

Steve said...

Yes...things can be wrong in Revit but at least they are wrong everywhere!! :)

Anonymous said...

Yup...I would say that inattention in any platform is the issue.

I have folks who still think Revit will do 'everything' for them coordination-wise. But it doesn't, and the same folks who let ACAD detail plans languish and get way-way out of date are the same ones who wonder why their live section detail doesn't look the same or the notes are no longer pointing to stuff went when they moved the call-out tag in plan. So instead of un-updated ACAD part plans I have updated revit part plans that are not correctly annotated anymore.

Of course, the graphic dissonance in the Revit plans is a prefect tool for seeing that it's wrong and getting it fixed...the un-updated ACAD plan will still look correct enough to avoid discovery.

n8 said...

"PLEASE, in the year of Two Thousand Fifteen, finally abandon your disconnected ways and use Revit (or ...Archicad)."

Well said. I often find myself having the same thought. It's 2015...why are we still using software (and issuing documents) like it is the 80's?

Tony said...

Lol. Yes, nice rant.

I still work with new Revit users on occasion who are more concerned about their lineweights and their "drafting standards" than about their actual design. Often because "that is how we've always done it."