Friday, August 15, 2008

Stacked Wall - Interior Partitions

One interesting use of Stacked Walls is to define an interior partition that has a gypsum wall Board (GWB) finish that rises to a fixed elevation while the metal stud structure carries on up until it reaches the underside of decking or some structure.


The first step is to create the two walls you need if they aren't already available. Most templates at least have the interior partition wall type. You may just need to create another version that has no gwb layers. Here is the stacked wall settings for the images above.



Note in my previous post the Top Extension Distance technique could be used with a single wall if the stud layer was "unlocked" instead of the finish layer. This way the stud layer could be extended to the structure and leave the finish at a preset height.

13 comments:

Robert said...

Nice tip !

Robert said...

Great minds apparently think alike I thew this tip up a couple of years ago on my blog, :). One team did try it out, but they had some problems. I think that you have to have a project that is very consistent and an experienced Revit team.

Steve said...

I probably stole it from you!!

Winn said...

Hi Steve

But these walls count up as double right? So i'll have 2 entries in my schedule for a single stacked wall. How do we get around this? Filter?

thanks ... great job!
winn

Steve said...

They do show up as two entries but not "double" as in twice as much...

They have a line item for the upper portion and the lower portion since they are technical different walls once the gwb stops.

Anonymous said...

Is there any way to make this a single wall type, so that it gets tagged separately? Say I have one wall type that goes from floor slab to ceiling slab (1 layer gwb each side of 2 1/2" mtl studs), and another wall type (1 layer gwb each side of 2 1/2" mtl studs)that stops at 6" above the ceiling. Technically in a schedule these would be different types of walls. If you use this method, revit will tag them as the same type.

Steve said...

A stacked wall will not tagged as a single element. Each wall can be tagged individually assume it can be "seen" by Revit in the view.

Anonymous said...

I have created a stacked wall (wall + wall sweep + wall dark)

In my elevations it doesn't show the edges right....

anyone knows how to solve this problem?

grtz from holland

maria said...

How can I add a parameter in a stacked wall (for example sound insulation?)

Steve said...

Stacked walls are "pretend" so you can't add a project parameter to Stacked Walls. You can add a project parameter to the Walls category which would make it available to any wall, including those that are part of a Stacked Wall definition.

S├ębastien Dubois said...

Hi Steve,

I was doing research on stacked walls and got to your blog. First... Wow great infos in here.

Second...
I though it was interesting to have a stacked wall in order to get a metal stud extending, as a second wall atop one with gypsum boards, to the slab above but I find it a bit tedious since you would need to create an array of "stud only" walls plus all the stacked wall types leading to a bit to much management for my taste.

I then proceeded to create a basic wall with the "stud" layer unlocked to be able to extend it further up and I came to an unexpected result. Scary actually!

It turns out that the wall area doesn't change, whether it'S for 6" or 6'-0".

if you create a wall schedule and a material schedule and play with the height of the Top extension, you'll notice that the are in the wall schedule doesn't change but materials are accurately changed.

That is something to be very careful with especially if the model is used for estimating without going into specific material quantities take off as opposed to a gross area take off.

We could loose some serious square footage in our estimate with this.

Food for thoughts!

Thanks again for sharing. I'm adding to my list of must read.

Steve said...

Often people have many "stud only" walls in their template already so it's not much extra work to combine them.

Unlocking and pulling the stud layer up is another way to accomplish the desired result but it too is extra steps and must be "seen" ideally to make sure it is done correctly.

Steve said...

I wrote about other options in this post too:

http://revitoped.blogspot.com/2008/08/interior-partition-offset-finishes.html